ATE shield prototype for MicroPython!
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Fixed UART labels.
Signed-off-by: Yilin Sun <imi415@imi.moe>
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MicroPython ATE Shield

Rev. A0 PCB

Why

This board is created trying to solve the following problem in MicroPython project:

What if the code compiles, but does not work as intended?

So an idea came up by @robert-hh, that we can make these testes automated with a "shield" (See here)

Some peripherals CAN be verified by connecting to itself, such as UART and GPIO, while others can't be easily verified without some on-board devices like sensors or EEPROMs. So instead of mounting all sensors on a board, a cheap MCU is used to act like some peripherals, which can produce controllable and repeatable results to DUT.

This board can be used to verify the following peripheral drivers:

  • ADC
  • UART
  • SPI
  • I2C
  • PWM
  • GPIO

LPC804

Why LPC804?

  • Cheap enough
  • Fully 5V IO tolarent
  • Has an DAC(!)
  • Switch Matrix